The Duttons of Vermont Genealogy & History

My Family Ties

Welcome to the Duttons of Vermont and surrounding New England area genealogy website. I do not limit my research to Vermont but that is where my father was born and raised and where I spent the majority of my younger years growing up. In my research, most of my Dutton relatives remained in Vermont or at least in New England, however a handful ventured west.

I look forward to meeting new “cousins” no matter how distant they may be.
I hope you find something interesting here or just something that might help you in your own research. Check back often as new information is always evolving as new facts surface.

If you find a discrepancy please feel free to use the “contact me” link at the bottom of the page or just sign the Guest Book to say hello.

On the right is a photo of my grandmother Zella (Snide), grandfather Ernest Perrin, uncle Cedric Leon, and father Ernest Herbert Dutton.

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Darrin Allen Dutton


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A Few Notable Ancestors From The Past

Herbert Wm Dutton

Father of Ernest Perrin Dutton and grandfather of Ernest Herbert and Cedric Dutton.

Lillie Mae Felch

Mother of Ernest Perrin Dutton and grandmother or Ernest Herbert and Cedric Dutton.

Mahala Dutton

She was aboard the Titanic with her husband, Walter Donald Douglas and maid, when it struck an iceberg in the Alantic. Mrs. Douglas, and her maid, survived the disaster, but after depositing his wife in a lifeboat Mr. Douglas stepped back and went down with the Titanic.
Bio by: Stas

Gov. Henry Dutton

1796-1869 Henry Dutton moved from Plymouth, CT to Newtown, CT in 1823. He served in the Connecticut House of Representatives in 1828, 1834, 1838, 1839, and 1850. He moved to Bridgeport in 1837, and then to New Haven, Connecticut in 1847 to accept the appointment to become Kent Professor of Law at Yale, a position he held until his death. He was also a member of the Connecticut Senate in 1849. He served as President pro tempore of the Connecticut Senate. He was the unsuccessful candidate for governor in 1853 of the Whig Party.

Ira Barnes "Brother Joseph" Dutton

He was born Ira Barnes Dutton in Stowe, Vermont, son of Ezra Dutton and Abigail Barnes. Dutton carried out his studies at Old Academy and Milton Academy, Wisconsin and in 1861 enlisted in 13th Wisconsin Infantry under Colonel Maurice Malooney. He was a quartermaster in the 13th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War. He had been raised Protestant in Baptist Sunday schools and was for a time married. The marriage did not last as his wife (who he never mentioned by name) was unfaithful and Dutton developed problems with alcohol. He quit drinking in 1876 and later took the name Joseph. He converted to Roman Catholicism in 1883 and afterward spent 20 months at the Abbey of Our Lady of Gethsemani. In 1886 Dutton went to Molokai to aid the dying Father Damien, who was grateful for his assistance. Dutton remembered that he told Father Damien "My name is Joseph Dutton; I’ve come to help, and I’ve come to stay" upon meeting him—and he did stay, for the remainder of his life. Dutton wrote the article "Molokai" for the Catholic Encyclopedia, and composed and sent many letters detailing life on the island, and U. S. President Theodore Roosevelt was one of those who read of his service to the ailing. He was so impressed by the veteran's work that he ordered the United States Navy's Great White Fleet to pay tribute to him by dipping their flags as they passed by the island. Dutton died in Honolulu on March 26, 1931. He was buried at St. Philomena Catholic Church Cemetery, Kalaupapa. In 2015, the Diocese of Honolulu set up a committee to evaluate the possibility of canonization. In December 2015, the Joseph Dutton Guild was established by the Diocese of Honolulu to petition the Diocese of Honolulu to start the formal cause of beatification and canonization. At the present, the Guild is in the process of collecting evidence to ascertain whether a petition for a formal cause is feasible.

Col Arthur Henry Dutton

Arthur was born in 1838 in Wallingford, Connecticut, to Samuel Dutton (1806-1851) and his wife Emily (Curtis) Dutton (1805-1875). He was married to Marion Sands Franklin (1840-1914) and the couple had at least one son, also named Arthur H. Dutton. Dutton's brother Clarence Edward (1841-1912) also was a soldier, serving as a major in his brother's Regiment during the American Civil War. On September 1, 1857, Dutton entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, and graduated 3rd out of 34 cadets on June 24, 1861. That year he also began attending Yale University in New Haven, but did not graduate. However his high class placement from West Point allowed Dutton to enter the prestigious U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and he was appointed as brevet second lieutenant the same day he graduated. On August 3 Dutton was promoted to full Second Lieutenant in the regular army. On May 26 Dutton was within Bermuda Hundred and was ordered to reconnoiter the opposing Confederate position with his brigade. Dutton advanced for about 2 miles and was on the skirmish line near Proctor's Creek, where he was hit mortally. He died of his wounds on June 5 in Baltimore, Maryland, and was buried with full military honors within Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. His family also erected a cenotaph to his memory in Memorium Cemetery in Wallingford, Connecticut, where his brother Clarence was also later buried. He was posthumously brevetted to the rank of Colonel in the Regular Army and to Brigadier General of Volunteers for his actions at Bermuda Hundred.


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We make every effort to document our research. If you have something you would like to add, please contact us.We strive to document all of our sources. If you have information to add, please send it to me.